A Sign of Integrity

A person with integrity is aware and concerned for the welfare of his family, neighbors, community, country, and the world.

A CEO with integrity is aware and concerned for the welfare of his employees, company, industry, country, and the world. He, too, tends to see his employees as a family, like Costco CEO and co-founder, Jim Sinegal.

A company with integrity has an internal culture that is concerned and supportive of its employees, customers, vendors, community, country, and the world.

The core of the ego says, “I’m most important; I must put my needs above all else.” This egotistic tendency isn’t a personal quality; we all have an ego. It’s only when a person’s ego is left unchecked that he is labeled narcissistic, self-centered, or ego-centric. It doesn’t serve us to condemn others or ourselves for having an ego. It is, however, helpful to understand the mechanisms and downsides of the ego.

A sign of integrity is when one evaluates decisions in light of its effect on others.

Those with integrity, however, are still human. A sign of integrity is not someone who doesn’t make mistakes, but someone who takes ownership when a mistake is made. Tiger Woods provides an exemplary model of someone who made egregious mistakes and then took responsibility for his wrongdoings—a clear sign of integrity.

Consideration and respect for your fellow human being has a transformative effect on yourself and others.